6.19.2016

Fussy Cut Hexy Elephant Quilt (Now That's a Mouth-full!)


This fun little number involved fussy cuts, (which I had been wanting to try), hexies (which I also wanted to try) and I did quite a bit of free motion quilting. Much of this fabric has been used in other quilts, so no sheep had to loose their winter coats and I was feeling too lazy to drive all the way to the fabric store to purchase batting so I used a piece of ugly green fleece in between the top and bottom for warmth. So, I saved gasoline and got rid of an ugly piece of fabric that I'd probably never use for anything else. Yeh me!

In case you don't know what fussy cut means...I didn't...it is just show-casing a cute design on a piece of fabric. In this quilt, obviously, it's the elephants. It often takes extra fabric because you have to cut out according to design.

This is not a project for the faint of heart...in other words, not a beginner. But, if you've made a few quilts, you like hexies and you love to sew---then here you go!







MATERIALS: I used scraps!
3/4 yard elephant print (I needed that much because of the special cuts)
Fat quarters: Blue, yellow, green, orange, purple and pink (You really don't need that much if you just want to use up your scraps)
3/8 yard: off white for sashing
1 1/2 yard: flannel for back
1/2 yard: for binding

DIRECTIONS:
First: You'll need a hexy template, a fabric pen and scissors (I prefer scissors for cutting these out)
I traced several (very carefully) on my fabric and cut them out with my scissors. Then I set the template over the top to make sure their size was correct.
These are the smallest size (2 1/2")








Second: Place your template over your fabric making sure design is in the center. Trace and cut.

Third: With fabric pen, mark an x 1/4" in from two corners (do this on all six hexies).


 Fourth: With right sides together sew fussy cut and first hexy together in between the two x's.


Sew the next one to the fussy cut in between the x's. You may have to unpick and do a little adjusting to make sure there are not puckers, after you make a couple it does get easier.





Fifth: After they are all sewn around fussy cut, check and make sure that there are no puckers or missed stitches. Then press seams on wrong sides.
 You will make eight of these.
Six:
Cut eight fussy cut squares with side lengths of 4 1/2"
Cut Eight squares with side lengths of 8 1/2" (I did two of each color)
Sixteen strips measuring 2 1/2 x 4 1/2" (I did four of each color)
Sixteen strips measuring 2 1/2 x 8 1/2" (I did four of each color)
For sashing (elephant print) cut two strips measuring 32 1/2 x 4 1/2",
and two, 40 1/2 x 4 1/2"
For outside sashing (offwhite) cut two strips measuring 40 1/2 x 2 1/2",
and two 44 1/2 x 2 1/2"
For binding cut six strips 2 1/2" by width of fabric

Seven: Center finished hexy on 8 1/2" square and applique down. I did mine on the machine using a blanket stitch, but you could do them by hand or use a zig zag stitch.

Eight: On each of the eight 4 1/2" squares, sew a 4 1/2 x 2 1/2" strip to opposite sides, and press. Then sew an 8 1/2 x 2 1/2" onto the other two sides and press. Do this for all eight squares.

Nine: Lay quilt out on design wall or floor to position colors to your liking. It should be a column of squares, a column of hexies, another column of hexies and a column of squares.

Ten:  Attach elephant sashing

Eleven: Attach off-white sashing

Twelve: Layer with batting and back and machine quilt yourself or pay someone else. I am practicing my walking foot and free motion quilting as often as possible. Long way from professional, but I enjoy learning.

3 comments:

  1. That is sew cute and very clear tutorial to complete it!!! I'm working with much larger hexies but find it quite fun to assemble them by machine (You get quite good at "eyeballing" the start & stop points!). Great post!

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Ha! I love how you used the word 'sew'. Thanks, I hope you are having sew much fun!

      Delete
  2. That is sew cute and very clear tutorial to complete it!!! I'm working with much larger hexies but find it quite fun to assemble them by machine (You get quite good at "eyeballing" the start & stop points!). Great post!

    ReplyDelete